Char-Koosta News

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Chief Charlo painting donated to CSKT

By Lailani Upham

In 1963, Sandy Ingersoll painted Chief Charlo crossing the Bitterroot to the Jocko valley in 1891. James Stover contracted with the CSKT tribes from 1963 – 1983 as a general auditor. His daughter stated he had high respect for the tribes and the history. (Lailani Upham photo) In 1963, Sandy Ingersoll painted Chief Charlo crossing the Bitterroot to the Jocko valley in 1891. James Stover contracted with the CSKT tribes from 1963 – 1983 as a general auditor. His daughter stated he had high respect for the tribes and the history. (Lailani Upham photo)

PABLO — A 1963 painting called, “Chief Charlo and the Flatheads Crossing the Bitterroot River,” by the late artist Sandy Ingersoll was brought to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes headquarters as a permanent display by the wishes of the late Jim and Beryl Stover last Wednesday.

The Stovers daughter Candie said her father always said when he passed he wanted to make sure the painting that sat in their living room from the time she was born would go to the Tribes.

Mr. and Mrs. Stover had worked for CSKT in the early 1960’s to the early 1980’s.

Both he and his wife operated the accounting firm Stover and Stover in Missoula and had been under contract with the Tribes as general auditors.

The connection the Stover’s had with the tribes were of interest and respect says their daughter Candie.

The painting is sizeable and stands at five feet tall and eight feet wide.

People’s Center Education Director coordinated the receiving end of the donation while Candie Stover organized the delivering and donation on behalf of her parents will and request. Stover said she is glad the painting is where it is supposed to be. (Lailani Upham photo) People’s Center Education Director coordinated the receiving end of the donation while Candie Stover organized the delivering and donation on behalf of her parents will and request. Stover said she is glad the painting is where it is supposed to be. (Lailani Upham photo)

Cyrus Vinton “Sandy” Ingersoll, Bitterroot Valley resident and artist passed away in 1989 at the age of 80. He was a nationally known artist and understudy to the legendary western artist Charlie Russell. Ingersoll painted over 500 pictures and many were sold to Eastern galleries, reported in his obituary.

According to Marie Torosian, Education Director for The People’s Center, the Stover’s had commissioned the painting in the 70’s.

Torosian explains the condition and design of the paining: “This painting is secure in its original frame. The oil canvas is in pristine condition. Colors are vivid having been restricted from sunlight for the life of the painting.”

The home of the painting has been set in the rear east end wall in the CSKT Council Chambers.

“Jim and Beryl respected the people with which they interacted. Many of their employees to this day remember their time working with CSKT,” stated Torosian.

Candie stated the experience of “bringing the painting home was wonderful and happy to complete her parents’ wishes.

The vast 50-year-old painting is delivered via horse trailer last Wednesday. (Lailani Upham photo) The vast 50-year-old painting is delivered via horse trailer last Wednesday. (Lailani Upham photo)

The Meadowlark Gallery in Billings states that, “Ingersoll’s family was among the original settlers that came to Montana when it was a territory. Sandy’s grandfather was an early Helena physician and his father drove stagecoach. As a child, Ingersoll spent much time listening to the tales of the “old timers” his family knew. These people were special to young Sandy; after all, they were the people who had converted Montana from wilderness to civilization. He remembered them and their stories. When he was old enough, Sandy worked for several cattle outfits. He did about every job associated with such operations and gained a real feeling for the cowboy’s life. Ingersoll later settled down on his own place. These many experiences left him with a wealth of knowledge about the West. This is the knowledge that aided him in his art.”

Words from Ingersoll on his work, “I paint the West—the West that I know and love. I try to capture scenes that people can enjoy and live with.”

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