Char-Koosta News

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Peoples’ Center Christmas Bazaar showcases local entrepreneurs

By Alyssa Nenemay

Aneena Antiste is a Salish Kootenai College student who became a Jamberry Nails consultant to earn extra cash. (Alyssa Nenemay photo) Aneena Antiste is a Salish Kootenai College student who became a Jamberry Nails consultant to earn extra cash. (Alyssa Nenemay photo)

PABLO — The People’s Center served as host to a Christmas bazaar to connect the reservation’s entrepreneurs with a variety of customers. While the selection of items weren’t bizarre, there was a range from the hand-crafted works to franchise opportunities.

Aneena Antiste is a liberal arts student at Salish Kootenai College and she has recently ventured into the Jamberry nail industry to earn extra cash while attending school. Jamberry nail shields are solid film coverings that are an alternative to nail polish. They come in an assortment of designs and are applied using hot air.

Antiste said she has learned a great deal about business since becoming a consultant. “It’s difficult because I’m still learning and the promotion is hard because I can’t be shy,” she said. “Advertising is fun and I like the product because it’s easy to use.”

While one young entrepreneur is hopping on the Bazaar trail to get introduced to business, Dennis and Susen Villegas are hoping their product will be their retirement. The couple has become consultants for the energy drink Reliv 24K. The drink contains no caffeine or sugar and includses beneficial ingredients including Omega 3 and vitamin B.

Dennis and Susen Villegas became consultants for the Reliv cellular repair drinks to promote health in the tribal community. (Alyssa Nenemay photo) Dennis and Susen Villegas became consultants for the Reliv cellular repair drinks to promote health in the tribal community. (Alyssa Nenemay photo)

Former owners of Villegas Janitorial, the couple adopted three young children and wanted to create a financial opportunity that would allow more time for family. Dennis began using the product as a result of health issues. “It just repairs your body on a cellular level,” he said. “My hair started to grow longer and thicker. I’ll be able to braid my hair again.”

The couple hopes consultant work will be the key to their retirement. They also say they hope their product will improve the community. “We want to share the health success with our community,” said Susen. “We want to get the rez healthy.”

The bazaar took a more conventional turn as mother and entrepreneur Raenelle Barnady displayed an assortment of beaded jewelry she created. Finding inspiration from every day life, Barnaby’s work featured basketball and soccer earrings, and large beaded medallion rings.

Raenelle Barnaby’s has turned her beading hobby into profit and says she is completely sustained from selling her artwork. (Alyssa Nenemay photo) Raenelle Barnaby’s has turned her beading hobby into profit and says she is completely sustained from selling her artwork. (Alyssa Nenemay photo)

The Shoshone Native said she has found success with beadwork being her primary means of work. “I’ve completely sold out at the (recent) Couer d’Alene stick game. I’m even starting to make a name for myself. I’ve had people hunt me down at powwows to buy my work. This work frees up my time for my kids and still allows me to be pay my bills.”

Barnaby learned the trade from her mother in 2006, and also through studying books. She said she enjoys the travel opportunities her work provides and she is passing the trade on to her children.

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